HomeNewsArticle Display

100th LRS holds safety event to underline dangers of drunk driving

Col. Carol Miller, 100th Mission Support Group commander, wears “drunk goggles” while attempting to walk a straight line at the end of an obstacle course during a 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron safety event at RAF Mildenhall, England, Oct. 11, 2019. Airmen and civilians put together the event which emphasized the dangers or drunk driving and showed the brutal consequences that can happen as a result. The 100th LRS Airmen and civilians worked together to put together an event focusing on the dangers of drunk driving and its consequences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

Col. Carol Miller, 100th Mission Support Group commander, wears “drunk goggles” while attempting to walk a straight line at the end of an obstacle course during a 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron safety event at RAF Mildenhall, England, Oct. 11, 2019. Airmen and civilians put together the event which emphasized the dangers or drunk driving and showed the brutal consequences that can happen as a result. The 100th LRS Airmen and civilians worked together to put together an event focusing on the dangers of drunk driving and its consequences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

Police Constable Simon Myall, Suffolk Police, breathalyzes an 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron Airman during a controlled drinking experiment as part of a safety awareness event at RAF Mildenhall, Oct. 11, 2019. The event was to focus on the dangers and show consequences of drunk driving, while at the same time promote safe practices for 100th LRS Airmen and civilians in a way other than slide shows.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

Police Constable Simon Myall, Suffolk Police, breathalyzes an 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron Airman during a controlled drinking experiment as part of a safety awareness event at RAF Mildenhall, Oct. 11, 2019. The event was to focus on the dangers and show consequences of drunk driving, while at the same time promote safe practices for 100th LRS Airmen and civilians in a way other than slide shows. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

An Airman from the 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron attempts to steer a remote-control car through a mini course while wearing “drunk goggles” at an event to highlight the dangers of drunk driving at RAF Mildenhall, England, Oct. 11, 2019. Members of Suffolk Police, along with the 48th Medical Operations Squadron Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, attended the safety event to show the effects alcohol has on motor skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

An Airman from the 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron attempts to steer a remote-control car through a mini course while wearing “drunk goggles” at an event to highlight the dangers of drunk driving at RAF Mildenhall, England, Oct. 11, 2019. Members of Suffolk Police, along with the 48th Medical Operations Squadron Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, attended the safety event to show the effects alcohol has on motor skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere)

RAF Mildenhall, England --

The 100th Logistics Readiness Squadron worked together to put on an event to educate Airmen on the dangers of drunk driving and how to prevent it Oct. 11, 2019, on RAF Mildenhall.

Working with Suffolk Police and Airmen from the 48th Medical Operations Squadron Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, the 100th LRS spent weeks putting the event together.

In addition to the ADAPT information booth, there was a driving simulator which gave a variety of scenarios showing drivers possible effects of driving while under the influence; an obstacle course on which people took turns walking around while wearing “drunk goggles,” and a presentation and videos from Suffolk Police showing footage from actual accidents caused by drunk drivers.

The event also included having a small amount of Airmen, both male and female with different body types, were assigned designated drivers, then consumed alcohol while performing tasks to demonstrate the how different body types of alcohol effect individuals based on their own anatomy.

“We wanted to have this event to promote safe practices and highlight the dangers of drunk driving and make people aware of the consequences,” said Nick Turpin, 100th LRS ground transportation training manager. “Drunk goggles will never obviously make you feel drunk or replicate that, but it’s the disorientation factor and the confusion that we wanted to emphasize.”

Throughout the event Airmen gained a greater understanding of drinking responsibly and a better awareness of the consequences of drinking and driving.

“Events like this are very good because it opens up the minds of the Airmen who are interacting with us, and it may hit a cord with them personally that actually, they don’t want their supervisor thinking they may have a drink problem. They’re here today, speaking to us to see what could actually happen, and it may make them seek some help or stop what they are doing before it gets out of control,” said Police Constable Paul Fletcher, Suffolk Police motor cyclist on Roadside Policing Team and Road Casualty Reduction Team.

Pairing with the Suffolk Police helped echo the main reason behind the event, which is to have a plan and make the right choices when consuming alcohol.

At the end of the event Airmen left with information about consuming alcohol responsibly and safe decision making, but were also reminded that taking care of each other as well as the community they live in can make a difference.